6th Draft

6th Draft

edits

The dreaded red pen has come out and the manuscript for The Puzzle Quests: Sketchy Dinosaurs has been printed. Not published, but printed and placed in a binder. There comes a point when I have to physically hold my work in progress and mark it up.

A few steps happen on the 6th edit. I’m looking at specifics, plot sequence, and clarity. For Sketchy Dinosaurs, this includes more interaction between Mark and Luke, including their comic that I have mentioned in the first two books. When writing a series, it’s important to make sure I bring the sub-plots to an end.

I’m looking at the themes I implemented. This may take a couple drafts. For this version, I’m focused on Mark’s love of food and his need to put ketchup on absolutely everything! Humor is a consistent theme in this book. How many times does Mark pass off his T-Rex as a lizard. Do I describe his dinosaur/lizard in enough detail so that the reader can picture it? I even tally the number of times I mention a theme just to make sure it’s developed enough.

Parts of the plot are still missing, like how will Mark rescue two more missing dinosaurs? I feel it needs more suspense on Mark’s part, which will help him grow. How is my main character growing and does he grow enough so that the reader will notice the change?

betareaderssketchydinosaurs
Mackenzie and Rebecca have been two of my beta readers since Shimmer’s Eggs!

At this point, I also bring in the beta readers. These are students ranging from 4-7 grade who have either read the previous books or are new to the series. They read the manuscript, make their own suggestions directly on the pages, and answer some of the questions I had above. They make my book the best it can be, and their feedback is essential.

In addition, involving children in the process creates strong readers and writers. Maybe they will be inspired to write their own stories. We get together and have a discussion and the ideas that come out of these sessions are impressive. Learning to respect one another’s views and suggestions is a powerful life lesson. This is one of my favorite parts of editing.

So for anyone who is writing their own book, know that the process can be long and arduous, but these steps are vital to a fabulous story. Have someone outside of your circle of friends and family read it so you get an unbiased opinion. I don’t have to worry about that with my beta readers–they are honest to the core!

Advertisements

Where Did That Come From!?

Where Did That Come From!?

Having a character or a plot twist thrust itself into your story is possibly the best part of being a writer. I love when I’m right in the middle of the scene about dragons and a baby T-Rex who has escaped from home and then bam! a WWII fighter plane shoots across the sky.¬†hellcat

Sometimes it takes me a minute to wonder what is going on? Then I ask the question–why? Why is there a fighter plane in the midst of Dragonia? The dinosaurs may be thinking that their world is once again coming to an end, but perhaps it’s that insufferable evil Lord Tam who has managed to bring a fighter plane through a portal. And if he did, how did he learn how to fly one? Which side was he on in the war? Just how old is Tam?

In his character description, he’s early to mid 30’s, so what’s the deal? That’s when imagination overdrive kicks in. Perhaps Tam and his equally evil twin, Tim, are able to time hop across time and dimensions. So not only can he travel back to current time, but he has lived in multiple previous times. Hence his ability to handle a pirate ship, fly a plane, and zip across the sky on a dragon!

It has a bit of the movie Timeline feel to it, when the archeologists manage to go back in time and send messages to the future. They learn the skills of their medieval world, but have modern technology that keeps them alive.

It’s not to say that the final draft will have this scene or the plane in it, but that’s the point. The first through almost final drafts are meant to play and see the possibilities of what could happen. If we don’t submerge ourselves in the what if’s, then the story may miss an exciting swerve.

quetzalcoatlus-size

In addition to dinosaurs and fighter planes, I have a feeling the Quetzalcoatlus may show up. If you read book one of The Puzzle Quests: Shimmer’s Eggs, you might remember how this prehistoric bird is Luke’s favorite. Sometimes the reasons are logical.

babybrindlegreatdane

Other times it’s because the character is just too cute! In Book Two of The Puzzle Quests: Saving Atlantis, Quinn and Mckenzie’s dog, Cinnamon, comes into the story. I just happened to pick that name, but then I googled cinnamon colored Great Danes and this cutie showed up!

Now Cinnamon is full grown, so this is what he’ll look like:

brindlegreatdane

Glorious isn’t he? Right now, baby T-Rex has just met Cinnamon. So far they are getting along, but we shall see what each chapter brings.

Exploring, imagining, testing, and taking chances. That’s what writing is all about. Sometimes you have to dive bomb toward the possibilities!

supermarine_spitfire_mk_xvi_nr

Puzzling Quests

Puzzling Quests

The third draft of book two of The Puzzle Quests is almost complete. Rewriting a book is basically like rearranging  those puzzles where you have to shift one word in order to make a sentence fit. Or slide a paragraph in order to make the whole picture make sense.

This is where I am right now. I have pages printed out and marked up. I have a word document with the actual draft, another with deleted passages (because you never want to permanently delete anything!), another with passages that will go into Mark’s Book Three, and a final one that contains passages based on Peter’s Book Four.

Peter has been a pest with Book Two. Of course he wants to be in the picture, because he has a lot to say about what Rose does. Rose has her moments of jumping into situations, which is why they probably get along so well. It’s more fun when you have someone to get in trouble with!

IMG_6295
Peter and Rose in Cape Cod

For example, Rose doesn’t think about what could happen when she swims off after a monstrous octopus, because he happens to have one of the missing Aegean Sea coins stuck in one of his suckers. Rose knows this coin is one of the five needed to save Atlantis. When the octopus hides between two rocks, Rose doesn’t take no for an answer. We have to applaud Rose for her determination, but sometimes she has to learn to walk away or wait for help.

When the octopus attacks and Rose is caught in its arms, pulling her further and further into the ocean depths, it takes her sea dragon, Sparkle, and the mermaid, Natalia, to save her. She manages to get the coin, but at what expense? Her friends, her life?

For me, writing a magical world is probably the best occupation in the world. I am inpatient like Rose and jump in with both feet. But that’s how I learn what works and doesn’t work. It’s a game of creating, shifting, and puzzling dilemmas. Ones that I hope you will enjoy.

Look for The Puzzle Quests: Saving Atlantis in the Fall of 2018!

 

 

Creative Writing and Journaling

Creative Writing and Journaling

plot

My fourth and fifth grade workshop students worked on getting to know their characters. Figuring out what they love more than anything else and the reason is a huge part of their motivation. Establishing their fear and throwing them into a dangerous situation where that fear is right in their face helps them decide what kind of person their character is. What are their strengths, weaknesses? Brave, strong, scared, helpless?

They are ready to begin their stories if they know the answers to these questions.

middlegradegratitude

My middle grade writers had fun decorating their Grasping Gratitude gift boxes. This special box holds what they are grateful for.

middlegradegratitude2

It’s an endless gift that we can always go back to when life gets too hard.

middlegradegratitude3

When we grasp gratitude, we hold the goodness in life that makes it worth living. We heal from the pain and loss that we feel. We appreciate what we have.

This was their favorite part of the workshop. I hope they continue to grasp the positive.